Eat, learn, and get inspired at the 3rd Annual Farm to Fork Festival

JACKSON, Wyo. — Beginning Friday, October 1st, Slow Food in the Tetons will host the third annual Farm to Fork Festival at The Center for the Arts; a weekend of presentations, panels, workshops and, of course, food! Friday’s sold out opener will feature food author and advocate, Mark Bittman, who will kick off the event with a keynote presentation and Q+A focused on food justice and his more than three decades of experience as an author, journalist, and leading voice in global food culture and policy.

Tickets for Friday night’s speaker are sold out, but space remains in some of Saturday’s workshops and discussion panels. Visit jhfartofork.com to register.

“At its core, the festival is a harvest celebration,” explains Scott Steen, Executive Director of Slow Food in the Tetons. “In addition to all the great food and flavors of the season, though, we’re hoping to engage participants in a deeper understanding and connection with the food system around us.” The festival schedule intended to feed, educate, and inspire includes a wide variety of workshops, farm tours, discussion panels, hands-on cooking and gardening activities, and online demonstrations involving chocolate design, brain healthy recipes, and other culinary topics.

Workshop presenters throughout the day on Saturday, October 2nd include local, statewide, and national experts in food, farming, soil health, sustainability, and cuisine, as well as leaders in food sovereignty and fostering the next generation of food producers. All festival venues are outdoors, with masks and covid-friendly spacing requested. Several online workshops are offered as well for those who prefer to participate from home.

Get your tickets while you still can! Photo: Courtesy of Slow Food in the Tetons.

Breaks in Saturday’s afternoon programming will allow participants to enjoy a free community lunch, provided by Slow Food in the Tetons, sourced using local ingredients, with boxed dishes prepared by chefs at Sweet Cheeks Meats, Palate, Snake River Grill, and Shooting Star. A total of 500 lunches will be given away beginning at 1:30pm and last until they’re gone. First come first served. Also on Saturday afternoon, there will be a farmer’s market from 1pm to 4pm on the Center Lawn where shoppers can stock up for winter on meat, vegetables, dairy and packaged food items from local farms, ranches, and food producers.

“The free, locally sourced community lunch is such an important part of the event,” says Steen. “The food system we experience every day is not always a fair system because the healthiest, freshest, most nutrient dense food is often only accessible to a select few. Saturday’s lunch is intended as a shared community meal that is open to everyone and a step toward the Slow Food vision of good, clean & fair food for all.”

Slow Food would like to thank Farm to Fork Festival lead sponsors Local and Trio. A complete festival schedule and registration for remaining spots in Saturday’s workshops and panels can be found online at jhfarmtofork.com. Some events, like the community lunch and farmer’s market are family friendly and free to attend and do not require advanced reservations. Other family friendly activities include a workshop on vermicompost (worms) at the Blair Community Garden, and tours of Vertical Harvest and Huidekoper Ranch.

For more information on the Farm to Fork Festival, visit jhfarmtofork.com. To learn more about the festival sponsor, Slow Food in the Tetons, visit www.tetonslowfood.org, or follow via Facebook @SlowFoodInTheTetons and Instagram @tetonslowfood.

About The Author

Sponsored by Slow Food in the Tetons

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