Library creates ‘JHBearHunt’ game amidst social isolation activities

JACKSON, Wyo. — Teton County Library youth services team, looking for ways to engage families during the library’s coronavirus-preventative closure, has started a community bear hunt, inspired by the children’s picture book “We’re Going On a Bear Hunt” by Michael Rosen and Helen Oxenbury.

“We’re asking people to place teddy bears in windows facing the streets,” says Beth Holmes, Library youth services program coordinator. “Then when families take walks or are driving around neighborhoods, their children can look for the bears—hence the name “bear hunt.”

Staying home is recommended by health officials encouraging people to do their part in preventing the spread of the virus. Those who must stay at home, especially families with children, can get a little stir crazy with not having many options for getting out of the house. Luckily the #JHBearHunt is a smart way to get out of the house while still avoiding contact with anyone who doesn’t live in the same household.

Community members are also encouraged to spread the word via social media by posting pictures of their own bears, and/or the bears they spot, using the hashtags #JHBearHunt and #TetonCountyLibrary.

According to Holmes, one neighborhood is way ahead on the program.

“We’ve heard that Rafter J has about 30 bears in windows so far!”

Families can view a video of Holmes describing the project, then reading We’re Going On a Bear Hunt, on a library webpage devoted to online storytimes. They’ll also find a growing number of videos of the youth services librarians performing storytimes on the page.

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