Help keep Jackson clean, watch those overflowing dumpsters and trashcans

JACKSON HOLE, WYO – It’s been dubbed the ‘Season of the Raven’—that time of year a few weeks after Spring Cleanup when crows, ravens and other birds of opportunity find great delight in overflowing dumpsters.

Trash escaping from various stuffed receptacles and then blowing around seems to be the main reason town streets can take on a littered look. Whether it is backyard trashcans packed a bit too high where the lids don’t quite cover the refuse or commercial dumpsters that are filling faster than they seemed to in winter—it is up to us to do our part in keeping the community clean.

It’s the right thing to do, and it is the law.

Town ordinance mandates that residences and businesses prevent their trash from overflowing. The penalty for being in violation is up to $750 per day.

One of the first things visitors notice about Jackson, and the lasting impression made on many tourists, is how clean our town is. And it’s true—Jackson is a clean community. That doesn’t happen by chance.

“We are all blessed to live in a spectacularly beautiful place, but we run the risk of diminishing the experience for everyone when garbage cans and dumpsters are allowed to overflow with refuse and become unsightly,” said Jackson Police Chief Todd Smith. “We are asking everyone to do their part to be in compliance with local regulations that are in place to ensure that Jackson provides a positive experience for residents and visitors alike.”

Alleyways behind local businesses, especially, can easily become a ‘breeding ground’ for garbage. Dumpsters teeming with trash make an easy target for birds and breeze, spreading the problem around town.

Some littering is the result of inattention to an overflowing garbage can. Some is simple ignorance of town ordinance. For instance, did you know it is unlawful to use cardboard boxes as a trash receptacle? Same goes for wooden boxes or barrels.

So what can you do if you see an overflowing dumpster or trash can? Report it to Officer Brian Morris, Code Enforcement with the Town of Jackson Police Department for follow up 733-1430.

We all need to do our part to help keep Jackson looking spotless and this begins with keeping our premises clean and orderly—a town ordinance since 1969.

To learn more, visit Town of Jackson’s website, under municipal codes title 8 “Health and Safety.

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