Caroline May Evans, Age 4, recently submitted an application for this 0.92-kg (2-pound) golden trout to potentially set the IGFA Female Smallfry Record for the species. Photo: Courtesy of IGFA

WYOMING — A two-pound golden trout recently caught in Wyoming by four-year-old Caroline May Evans, is up for world-record consideration.

On Saturday, The International Game Fish Association (IGFA) delivered the news via Twitter that Caroline “recently submitted an application for this 0.92-kg (2-pound) golden trout to potentially set the IGFA Female Smallfry Record for the species.”

“Caroline was fishing in Wyoming. After a quick fight and weighing, she was able to safely release the fish.”

The announcement made by IGFA did not clarify where Evans made the catch. However, Golden Trout is a species of trout native to California’s southern Sierra Nevada mountains and is normally found in Golden Trout Creek, Volcano Creek, and South Fork Kern River.

“Golden trout are native to the Sierra Nevada, and were transplanted by Wyoming Game and Fish to the Winds from the Kern River system in the 1940s, during a brief period when the state of California allowed golden-trout eggs to be exported. Goldens now grow bigger in Wyoming (they also thrive in the Beartooth Range) than anywhere else on earth,” said Ben Gose of WyoFile.

While the IGFA has separate Smallfry categories for boys and girls age ten or younger, they still must abide by all IGFA international angling rules “with the exception that fish do not have to be weighed on land.”

73 years ago Wyoming set the world record for golden trout catches. The catch, which is IGFA’s overall world record for golden trout, measured 28 inches and weighed 11.25 pounds. It was caught by Chas Reed in Cook Lake in Wyoming in 1948.

Buckrail @ Caroline

Caroline Chapman is a Community News Reporter. She enjoys reading non-fiction, skiing, hiking, and playing piano in her downtime. Her favorite aspect about living in Jackson is the genuine admiration that Wyomingites share for the land and the life that it sustains.