Animal Adoption Center headed to the rez to spay/neuter, you can help by drinking beer!

JACKSON HOLE, WYO –The Animal Adoption Center (AAC) is headed back to the Wind River Reservation next weekend for a free spay/neuter clinic.

AAC is dedicated to reducing the number of homeless animals through adoption, rescue, education and spay/neuter. The AAC’s Spay/Neuter Wyoming Program attacks the root of the pet overpopulation problem through free and low-cost spay/neuter across Wyoming. On Oct. 19-20 the AAC will host its third, free spay/neuter clinic this year on the Wind River Indian Reservation.

Conditions on the Wind River Reservation are not the greatest and as a result, many domestic pets like dogs and cats are often neglected and allowed to run wild. AAC tries to make 2-3 trips a year there to offer free spay/neuter program.

While there the AAC’s mobile team including four veterinarians, six veterinary technicians and dozens of volunteers will work to spay or neuter nearly 200 animals. The AAC mobile spay/neuter team targets the Wind River Indian Reservation with an emphasis on visiting the Arapaho and Shoshone tribes at least twice yearly. These services are provided to enrolled tribal members at no cost. Vaccinations are also available.

“The need for this type of work on the reservation simply cannot be overstated,” said Carrie Boynton, Executive Director of AAC. “The number of homeless animals in this area is staggering, yet undocumented. There is no animal control, frequent outbreaks of parvovirus and distemper, countless unwanted litters, and hundreds of requests for spay/neuter services. All of these factors, along with the level of poverty, illustrate the tremendous need for assistance.”

Since 2010, Spay/Neuter Wyoming has hosted 17 clinics on the reservation and 54 across the state. These clinics, in concert with low-income spay/neuter vouchers and the Wyoming Shelter Project, have resulted in more than 11,000 spay/neuter surgeries across the state. As a result, there has been a significant reduction in number of strays and dog bites on the reservation as well as a significant decrease in euthanasia rates in partnering communities.

Want to help?

Mah Di’s Rescue Brew. (SRB)

The Animal Adoption Center is currently running a pet and human food drive and will be giving the resources out to people in need during the clinic. AAC has also partnered with Snake River Brewing. SRB will be pouring Mah Di’s Rescue Brew starting Saturday, and have pledged to donate one dollar of every Rescue Beer sold to the Spay/Neuter Wyoming Program.

There are three great ways to get involved with this life-saving work:

  1. Drink Mah Di’s Rescue Brew. Snake River Brewing created a special brew in honor of Dr. Heather Carleton’s rescue dog, Mah Di (meaning “good dog” in Thai). This beer was made to celebrate all of the lives saved through animal rescue and to support the AAC’s Spay/Neuter Wyoming Program. While Mah Di’s Rescue Brew is on tap, Snake River Brewing will donate $1 to Spay/Neuter Wyoming for every pint sold. Enjoy yours beginning October 13.
  2. Be part of the food drive. The AAC is hosting a food drive for humans, dogs and cats. Donated food will be distributed to tribal members in need during the spay/neuter clinic. If you wish to donate, please bring food to 270 East Broadway by Wednesday, October 18.\
  3. Foster and/or adopt. The Animal Adoption Center often returns from the Wind River Indian Reservation with homeless animals in need of foster care while they wait for to find their forever homes. If you are interested in helping these animal please consider becoming a foster or adopting. Learn more at www.animaladoptioncenter.org or call 307-739-1881.

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