Alps - Mount Scenery

A warm pattern will remain in place for the next few days with isolated afternoon thunderstorms. Big changes will arrive this weekend as a cold low pressure system approaches, leading to cooler and wetter conditions, along with lowering snow levels on Sunday and Monday.

Wednesday:

Scattered clouds and gusty west/southwest can be expected again today with highs in the mid 70s in the valley. Isolated thunderstorms will develop this afternoon, favoring the Tetons and Victor/Driggs and especially farther north in Yellowstone where storms will be more numerous. Once again, any rainfall will be light.

Thursday:

Temperatures will warm up a few degrees with continued scattered clouds and gusty winds. There will be only a low threat for an isolated afternoon thunderstorm, but most areas will stay dry.

Friday:

Temperatures will warm up into the 80s ahead of an approaching trough of low pressure. Conditions should stay dry for most of the day before thunderstorm chances arrive by late afternoon and into the evening.

Saturday:

The wet pattern arrives with scattered showers beginning on Saturday morning, then becoming more widespread during the afternoon with thunderstorms also possible. Temperatures will be a lot cooler with highs in the 60s.

Sunday:

Periods of showers will continue throughout the day and a stronger cold front will arrive sometime during the day as well, leading to chilly temperatures and a changeover to snow across the higher elevations. Snow levels will continue to drop on Sunday night as colder air filters in, and we could see snowflakes reaching the valley floor by Monday morning.

Alan Smith, Meteorologist

 

 

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Buckrail Meteorologist Alan Smith

Alan is a professional meteorologist who holds a degree from MSU Denver and writes weather forecasts for Buckrail. He has lived in Jackson full-time since 2015. He is currently a Meteorologist and Operations Manager for OpenSnow, which is a weather forecasting service for skiing and outdoor adventures. At OpenSnow, Alan writes forecasts for the Tetons, Pacific Northwest, British Columbia, and North America as a whole.